March



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March 31, 2019
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Brexit Irony-Immigration Likely To Rise Post-Brexit Says Lawyer

A leading business immigration lawyer has predicted that pre-referendum pledges to reduce immigration will ‘not survive’ Brexit and claimed the process will actually lead to great net immigration to the UK.

With Brexit continuing to bring uncertainty across business there are conflicting reports on how it will affect immigration. Sajid Javid claims that the government will control the ‘number and type’ of people allowed to live and work in the UK, Migration Watch UK predicts a 100,000 increase in net migration. 

Recent statistics show that while EEA migration has dropped sharply, non-EEA net migration is at its highest level for 15 years, with the government further than ever from its target of “tens, not hundreds of thousands” a year. 

Matthew Davies, a partner at Midlands law firm Wright Hassall, said: “The general idea was that leaving the EU would allow the UK to ‘take control’ over immigration, implying more stringent restrictions on those coming to live and work here. The reality is more nuanced. 

“The irony is that leaving the EU will, in the longer term, increase net economic migration to the UK, both legal and illegal, whatever people thought they were voting for,” says Davies.

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March 25, 2019
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UK Issues Regulations on Post-Brexit Data Protection Law

Two sets of regulations aimed at readying UK data protection law for a post-Brexit world have been promulgated in recent weeks.  These regulations, which were made pursuant to the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (EUWA), will only come into force in most respects upon the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.  Broadly speaking, these regulations are intended to preserve the status quo post-Brexit by (1) amending certain provisions of the GDPR to allow it to be retained as UK domestic law and (2) transitionally adopting certain key decisions of the EU institutions that, collectively, would allow for the continued lawfulness of personal data flows out of the United Kingdom where currently permitted under EU law.  In both regards, these regulations are consistent with prior guidance from the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (discussed here).

The bulk of the first set of regulations—The Data Protection, Privacy and Electronic Communications (Amendments etc) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019—is dedicated to localising the GDPR into UK domestic law.  Following the UK’s departure from the EU, certain language in the GDPR—for instance, that requiring consultation of, or affording decisionmaking authority to, the European Commission or European Data Protection Board—will no longer be appropriate in a purely domestic context.  These regulations therefore re-assign powers afforded to EU institutions under the GDPR to UK equivalents and substitute EU-specific language in the GDPR with UK-appropriate terms (e.g., replacing “GDPR” with “UK GDPR”).

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| Referencing and Verification Services | Security
March 20, 2019
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Insider threat is more common than you think

A recent article in Dark Reading explains how  new study shows why the security industry needs to review cyber-security, compliance and technology alongside human resources in order to understand workforce risk.

Only half of those in the security industry in the USA undertake post-employment screening the article goes on to explain how pre-employment and post-employment screening can help to identify workforce risk.

 

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